A Friendly Hand

José López Zamorano | La Red Hispana 
Photo Credit: La Red Hispana

The COVID-19 pandemic has altered our lives in many ways. It is therefore absolutely understandable that many of us have focused our attention and energies on how to keep our families protected, as well as informing ourselves about the safety and efficacy of available vaccines. But it is important to bear in mind that millions of people around us suffer other types of ailments and that there are ways through which we can make a difference in the lives of these people, even save their lives in emergency situations.

In the United States, for example, there are more than 3.4 million people living with epilepsy. Epilepsy is one of the four most common neurological disorders, despite its diagnosis and treatment not always occurring with the amount of focus that the disease deserves. According to the Epilepsy Foundation, 30 percent of people living with epilepsy are not in complete control of their seizures and continue to struggle day after day with the imminent threat of having a seizure.

I have participated for several years in the campaigns of the Epilepsy Foundation and it never ceases to amaze me that even before learning about the efforts of the organization, epilepsy was an invisible condition for me. Now I know that 1 in 10 people may experience some kind of seizure in their lifetime. Worst of all, most of us don’t know what to do to help someone who is having a seizure.

The good news is that, without neglecting the protections we require during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Epilepsy Foundation has persevered in its efforts to train school personnel, first responders, seniors, and those in charge. caring for others with epilepsy so that they recognize seizures and can properly administer first aid.

The Epilepsy Foundation recently launched its free Seizure Recognition and First Aid Certification training – – in Spanish and in person or via Zoom. It is the first and only training to offer a certification for the general public to learn how to help and support the millions of people living with epilepsy.

Hispanics are people with a good heart, and we are always ready to help or render first aid to those who need it. In this case, it is a matter of complementing our willingness to help others, with the training and qualification necessary to appropriately respond to an epileptic crisis.

In the United States, there are approximately 710,000 Hispanics living with epilepsy. Being empowered and trained to offer a helping hand during a seizure can save that person’s life.

I encourage everyone to sign up for the free Epilepsy Foundation Seizure Recognition and First Aid training. For more information or to learn more about basic first aid steps in the event of a seizure— Stay. Safe. Sideways. – visit epilepsy.com/first-aid.

For more information visit www.laredhispana.com.

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